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THE CATHOLIC BUSINESS NETWORK PRESENTS

TIM WILSON

Guest speaker Tim Wilson will be sharing his journey as a former broadcaster, journalist, US correspondent, author and now Executive Director of Maxim Institute...

21 OCTOBER 2022

TIM WILSON

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, MAXIM INSTITUTE

Guest speaker Tim Wilson will be sharing his journey as a former broadcaster, journalist, US correspondent, author and now Executive Director of Maxim Institute, a public policy and research think tank. Tim will be speaking on the importance of failure as well as the impact of converting to Catholicism on his professional and personal life.

Before becoming Executive Director of Maxim, Tim was an award-winning journalist working in print, radio and television. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian and Newsweek.com. He was TVNZ’s first US Correspondent, and has also been a business development manager, and an English teacher. Tim has written three novels, one of which, Their Faces Were Shining, was a finalist in the New Zealand Post Book Awards. He is married to Rachel; they have three sons: Roman, Felix and Wilfred

The event will take place in the Limes Rooms at the Town Hall. Secure your ticket today to not miss out on this memorable event!

DATE: Friday 21 October 2022          TIME12:00pm - 2.00pm         VENUE: Limes Room, Christchurch Town Hall

You will be redirected to humanatix.com to purchase your tickets

SAVE THE DATE: Next CBN Event - 21 October 2022

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BROTHER GUY CONSOLMAGNO

Brother Guy Consolmagno is the director of the Vatican Observatory and president of the Vatican Observatory Foundation. Raised in Detroit, Michigan, he studied Earth and Planetary Sciences at MIT for his bachelor’s and master’s degrees and at the University of Arizona for his doctorate. During a break in his studies he spent two years teaching astronomy in Narobi for the Peace Corps. Having attended a Jesuit high school, Consolmagno contemplated joining the church at several points in his career before joining the order in 1989. Two years later, he was called to serve at the Vatican Observatory where he has been ever since. Consolmagno’s research has always focused on the smallest bodies in our solar system and his work at the Vatican has allowed him to make significant contributions to this field over the past several decades. In 2014, he was awarded the Carl Sagan Medal by the American Astronomical Society for outstanding communication of planetary science to the public.